National, News

The Woman Feminists Ignore

She graduated magna cum laude from Trinity College and attained her law degree from George Washington University. She founded and ran The Polling Company Inc./Women Trend, a market research and political polling firm. She is an author, she is the first woman to be a successful presidential campaign manager, and she will serve as Counselor to the President in President Trump’s administration, all while being a married mother of four children. Sounds like a feminist icon. However, there is a problem. She is a Republican.

Kellyanne Conway has risen to prominence in a male dominated profession, and played a key role in pulling off one of the biggest upsets in American political history.

However, there is more concern in the media about what she wore to the inauguration than the fact that she helped make the inauguration of President Donald Trump a reality.

Trump referred to Conway as “a trusted advisor and strategist who played a crucial role in my victory.”

Holly Scheer wrote in the Federalist that Kellyanne Conway is “a rockstar in politics right now, and that her reputation is hard-earned and well-deserved.”

Kellyanne Conway has extensive experience working for Republican candidates and officeholders alike. Primarily through her polling firm, she has worked for Newt Gingrich, Ted Cruz, Mike Pence, and many others. Her primary focus has been on outreach to women.

Many so-called feminists are actors who make a living by pretending to be someone else in front of a camera. Kellyanne Conway, on the other hand, has done countless interviews on camera and worked tirelessly behind the scenes for her various clients. Kellyanne Conway is a genuine hard-working woman, and it would be beneficial to celebrate women like her. Our society could use less coverage of people whose only talent is pretending to be someone else, particularly when talking about politics. We could also use more coverage when talking about people, particularly women, who have actual talent and have created a name for themselves in a world outside of the pretend.

2 Comments

  1. Shane Bridger Lutz

    This is not journalism.
    I’m very sorry, Mr. Pickard, but your article – especially in an era of fake news and “alternative facts” – deserves scrutiny. First of all, your article does not follow the Associated Press Stylebook, which offers a central format for journalistic endeavors to create a uniform layout across news outlets. It deals with the placement of quotes and commas and addresses how to properly use grammar in journalism. It’s a great resource, especially for a young newspaper like the Wake Forest Review, to establish a foundation and credibility.
    Secondly, your article takes vandalistic liberties and calls them quotes. I, the reader, do not care that Trump trusts Conway; I would hope he does, since he selected her to be an advisor. You also quote Holly Scheer – a person I do not know, whose credentials I do not know, whose relevance to this article I do not know – and offer nothing of substance with her words but praises of Conway. Other people’s endorsements – as we learned with Hillary Clinton’s campaign – do not equal qualification or the right to my respect.
    You mention her “extensive experience” briefly, but offer only three sentences on it that offer no specifics to what her background is. This should be the body of the article so that Mr. Trump and Ms. Scheer’s comments have some semblance of validity with factual evidence to back it up. You claim “[h]er primary focus has been on outreach to women” and yet where is that record here?
    This is not journalism because these are not facts. You brandish excessive and biased language and leave out any credible, fact-checkable evidence. You say: “Kellyanne Conway is a genuine hard-working woman, and it would be beneficial to celebrate women like her. Our society could use less coverage of people whose only talent is pretending to be someone else, particularly when talking about politics. We could also use more coverage when talking about people, particularly women, who have actual talent and have created a name for themselves in a world outside of the pretend.”
    Where are the facts? I cannot fact-check these statements because they are opinions. Opinions aren’t journalism – they’re just space fillers.
    And last, but certainly not least, we should encourage the conversation about feminism on any level to include women from all political spectrums and walks of life. However, we’ve fallen into a rut where two white men – you and I – are now discussing the rights and quality of women in a way that’s bizarrely inappropriate. I encourage you to investigate where your work could use intersectionality and a larger context of whose voices you’re reporting on.

    I validate and encourage diversity of opinions, and I also think it’s important to have representation of all voices on a college campus. That means the Wake Forest Review has an extremely unique opportunity to be a voice for a large portion of campus that considers itself conservative. I challenge you then to represent that demographic with accuracy and fact-based news. Do not be a tabloid; do not be a source for anger and attention-grabbing headlines littered with venom solely for the comments, shares, and attention. Don’t be a tabloid, Wake Forest Review: I challenge you to be a newspaper.
    I look forward to hearing you cover news.

  2. Your motto “Truth without fear” tastes a bit sour when every comment that opposes your opinion takes days to pass your “moderator approval.”
    But don’t worry – I’m patient.